Interview with Ler Lee Cheng

November 13, 2012 by  
Filed under Blog

Ler Lee Cheng - Garbage Enzyme

We interviewed Ler Lee Cheng for the tip on Make Garbage Enzyme, here’s the full interview:

Describe yourself and what you do.

Hi, my name is Ler Lee Cheng. I run thediysecrets.com, blogging about my discovery on natural living and selling green products such as soap nuts online.

Why did you start making garbage enzyme? Who taught you?

I started making garbage enzyme since year 2009. I still remember I was curious and excited at the same time when my aunty and cousin shared with me that it is possible to make my own household cleanser. I wanted to avoid using the chemically formulated detergents and powder and replace them with all natural cleanser. I want to live more naturally.

Are the fruit leftovers from your home? Describe how you make garbage enzyme.

Yes, the fruit leftovers came from my home. I love to eat fruits and drink fruit juice, and thus my fruit waste is mainly peels and pulps.

It is really easy to make Garbage Enzyme. Simply add 3 kg of leftover fruits and/or its peels, 1 kg of black sugar and 10 litres of water into a plastic pail. Stir to mix it well and put on the lid and date it. Let it ferment for 3 months. During fermentation, open up the lid every two weeks or so to release the gas built-up.

Once it is ready, filter off the residue and decant the liquid into recycled plastic bottles. You can reduce or increase the proportion accordingly. The result is a homemade vinegar cleanser from my fruit waste.

What do you use the enzyme for? Is it effective? Any smell?

I love to use the garbage enzyme to mop my floor, wash my sinks and toilets. It removes dirt and grease really well. I recall how pleasantly surprised I was when my dirty sink with stains turned out sparkling clean after using Garbage Enzyme.

Garbage enzyme has a pungent vinegary smell. And it can smell really nice depending on the fruit waste that goes into the fermentation. The smell varies. Sometimes could be citrus and sourish, and sometimes bitter. You don’t have to worry about the smell as it will dissipate after a while.

Interview and Image credit: Ler Lee Cheng

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